ITK

The Chiofaro Company At A Glance


PROJECT STATUS
Under Official Review: 1

WORK BY SECTOR
Retail: 1 |
Office: 1

PROJECT SIZES
$0 - $10M: 0 | $10M - $100M: 0 | $100M+: 1

Totals

Total Square Footage Free
Total Dollar Volume Free

General

Established 1980
Website Free
Phone Number ITK

The Chiofaro Company is a privately held, independent firm engaged in the development, investment, leasing, management and ownership of real estate properties of the highest quality. They are one of New England's leading developers and operators of first class commercial and research projects. 

Their successful track record and impressive client list are a direct result of their uncompromising focus on creating and maintaining workplaces of extraordinary value - workplaces that enhance the competitiveness of their tenants.

Updates

The Pinnacle at Central Wharf
- Jan 23, 2020

The Pinnacle at Central Wharf, Chiofaro's Harbor Tower, Now Under Review The Chiofaro Company has filed the project notification form for the Harbor Garage Tower, now dubbed The Pinnacle at Central Wharf. Plans call for a 600-foot tower to feature 865,00 square feet of mixed-use space. The project would include approximately 200 rental units on the highest floors over 538,000 square feet of office space. The first 2 floors of the building would also offer 42,000 square feet of retail/restaurant space. Additionally, a below-grade garage will include space for 1,100 vehicles. Another key piece of the development is the 28,000 square feet of waterfront public space. The space is designed as an outdoor gathering space that would seamlessly integrate into the New England Aquarium's "Blueway".


The Pinnacle at Central Wharf
- Nov 20, 2019

After Years of Planning, Highly-Anticipated Harbor Garage Project is Launched After seven years of planning, The Chiofaro Company announced today the filing of a ‘Letter of Intent’ with the Boston Planning and Development Agency for the redevelopment of the Harbor Garage.  The project will be the first proposed under the state-approved Downtown Waterfront Municipal Harbor Plan (MHP), which was the product of a comprehensive process, culminating in guidelines that last week were codified in the Boston Zoning Code.  The to-be-named Garage redevelopment will serve as an international model for waterfront development in the 21st century, given its unparalleled opportunity to replace an auto-centric obstacle to harbor access with significant new public open space along the waterfront in Boston’s urban core.  The transformative project, anchored by an architecturally distinctive tower designed by the world-renowned firm of Kohn Pederson Fox Associates, will serve as a gateway to the city, building upon the successes of the Boston Harbor cleanup and the Rose Kennedy Greenway, and enabling the execution and seamless integration of the New England Aquarium’s ‘Blueway’ vision.  "We have an enormous responsibility to the City after a lengthy and inclusive MHP process, where a wide range of contributors worked collectively to lay the groundwork for ‘Boston’s next great place.’ This project will be the catalyst for that transformation.  It's time to allow residents of – and visitors to – Boston the opportunity to enjoy the full potential of our city’s waterfront," said Don Chiofaro, Founder and President of The Chiofaro Company. Combining commercial and residential elements, the mixed-use tower will be ringed with multiple stories of public retail amenities, providing seven-day energy that will activate the surrounding open space and amplify the area’s existing and future cultural and educational assets.  By removing the seven-story, block-long barrier of the existing garage, the project will open both visual and physical access from the Greenway to the harbor, creating new connections and inviting the diverse cross-section of visitors who enjoy the Greenway’s Rings Fountain across the street to experience the water firsthand. Reflective of the new reality of coastal cities, climate resiliency is also at the heart of the project, which will be the first designed to incorporate the findings of the City’s “Climate Ready Downtown and North End” plan.  While the project itself will be a model of resilience, it will also play a key leadership role in the implementation of district-wide solutions.   Following the appointment of an Impact Advisory Group for the project, the next step in the City’s Article 80 development review process is the filing of a Project Notification Form (PNF), which will provide additional detail about the program, architecture, engineering, and project benefits. “We are excited about how the design work has progressed and, over the next few months, we’ll be refining our ideas and preparing to shift from talking in the abstract about aspirations to engaging in a robust public discussion of a real design”, said Don Chiofaro, Jr., company Vice President and Project Manager.


The Pinnacle at Central Wharf
- Sep 13, 2019

BPDA Approves Municipal Harbor Plan: Allows Zoning for Habor Garage Tower The Boston Planning Board has approved the new Municipal Harbor Plan. Part of the plan allows for the zoning of the 600' Harbor Garage Tower. The MHP will be brought to the zoning commission next month for further approval. While it will still need to go through the Article 80 process, The Harbor Garage plans to combine cutting-edge architecture with a grand public gathering place over 900,000 square feet of space.  


The Pinnacle at Central Wharf
- Jun 28, 2018

Plans Revealed for the "Blueway"Since purchasing the Boston Harbor Garage in 2007, the Chiofaro Company has been working toward developing an almost 600 foot tower on the site. After gaining state approval earlier this year, the company plans to seek city approval this summer and has released new renderings of “The Blueway”.  These new renderings show the busy plaza that will sit at the base of the tower and connect the waterfront to Boston’s “Greenway”.“The Blueway” will be a key part of this much debated project as Chiofaro hopes it will allay concerns about the tower cutting off access to the public waterfront.  With legal challenges pending from the Harbor Tower’s trustees and The Conservation Law Foundation, an environmental advocacy group, it remains to be seen when and if this project will get off the ground.


The Pinnacle at Central Wharf
- May 02, 2018

Municipal Harbor Plan Approval Enables Two Landmark Waterfront DevelopmentsThe Boston Planning and Development Agency (BPDA) has approved a new Municipal Harbor Plan (MHP) to establish guidelines for new development along the Downtown Boston waterfront. With the approval of the MHP, two proposed landmark waterfront mixed-use projects at the Hook Wharf and Harbor Garage sites can now be developed. Both of these projects will individually undergo Article 80 large project review and will require design approval before construction.The Hook Wharf and Harbor Garage sites At Hook Wharf, the site of the James Hook Lobster Company restaurant at the corner of Atlantic Avenue and Seaport Boulevard, the Hook family, which owns the wharf and the eponymous seafood restaurant, will build a 22-story building designed by Elkus Manfredi Architects. The Hook Wharf building will feature a new ground-floor seafood restaurant with residences on upper floors. Per the MHP, the James Hook building is allowed up to 305 feet in height (285 feet to the highest occupied floor), 275,000 gross square feet of total floor area and 70 percent lot coverage. The MHP guidelines will require the Hook family to contribute $1.5 million towards the construction of a new continuous Harborwalk connection linking Hook Wharf to the other side of the Moakley Bridge.A preliminary rendering of the Hook Wharf building A preliminary massing diagram of the Hook Wharf building At the site of the Harbor Garage, an existing 70-foot high parking structure, an iconic tower will be developed by owner Don Chiofaro. The MHP allows the Harbor Garage tower up to 585 feet in height to the highest occupied floor; the tower may in no case exceed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) limit of 600 feet high. The tower may contain up to 900,000 gross square feet of total floor area and may cover up to 50 percent of the project site.The MHP guidelines will require Chiofaro to contribute $5 million in funds towards the neighboring New England Aquarium’s vision for a proposed “Blueway” waterfront greenway and $5 million towards converting the Chart House parking lot on Long Wharf to public open space. The tower must avoid casting a net new shadow on Long Wharf seaward of the existing Marriott hotel.A rendering of an earlier Harbor Garage development proposal A preliminary massing diagram of what the Harbor Garage development could look like Proposed Blueway The 42-acre waterfront area covered by the MHP, namely the area between Atlantic Avenue and the Inner Harbor stretching from Hook Wharf to Long Wharf, consists of 22 acres of filled and flowed tidelands in addition to sections of Boston Harbor. Therefore, existing planning regulations regarding height, floor area ratio (FAR), open space requirements, massing and other dimensional factors as dictated by the State of Massachusetts’ waterways protection law, Chapter 91, apply.A map of the MHP district Chapter 91 preserves public access to waterfronts and mitigates the environmental impact of new development. Additional Chapter 91 legislation enacted by the State of Massachusetts in 1990 also sets a height limit of 55 feet for new buildings over water or within 100 feet of the high-water mark. Most buildings on the Downtown Boston waterfront were built prior to the legislation; exemptions have been made for some more recent developments, for instance on Fan Pier in the Seaport District and on Lovejoy Wharf in Bulfinch Triangle. If a proposed project complies with the MHP, as with the Hook Wharf and Harbor Garage developments, then Chapter 91 height restrictions can be waived.The approved MHP also establishes climate change resiliency as a key component for general waterfront planning. The MHP has set new height allowances for improvements to existing buildings in anticipation of climate change, namely elevating mechanical systems to avoid flooding. Per the MHP, such buildings may add up to two new floors not exceeding 30 feet of new height and including mechanical systems.Height restrictions for additions to existing buildings The MHP establishes six overall goals for new development:Create a mixed-use, active neighborhood;Provide public access to Boston Harbor, the Boston Harbor Islands, and water transportation;Improve wayfinding and open-space connections along the Waterfront;Enhance and create open space resources, as well as improve public realm;Ensure climate resilience; andImplement the existing Greenway District guidelines:Create and enhance access to the waterfront and South Boston;Reinforce open space;Ensure the Harborwalk is fully accessible; andDiversify abutting uses


The Pinnacle at Central Wharf
- Mar 14, 2017

By Matthew M. Robare The Boston Planning and Development Agency (BPDA) has approved a new Municipal Harbor Plan (MHP) to establish guidelines for new development along the Downtown Boston waterfront. With the approval of the MHP, two proposed landmark waterfront mixed-use projects at the Hook Wharf and Harbor Garage sites can now be developed. Both of these projects will individually undergo Article 80 large project review and will require design approval before construction. The Hook Wharf and Harbor Garage sites At Hook Wharf, the site of the James Hook Lobster Company restaurant at the corner of Atlantic Avenue and Seaport Boulevard, the Hook family, which owns the wharf and the eponymous seafood restaurant, will build a 22-story building designed by Elkus Manfredi Architects. The Hook Wharf building will feature a new ground-floor seafood restaurant with residences on upper floors. Per the MHP, the James Hook building is allowed up to 305 feet in height (285 feet to the highest occupied floor), 275,000 gross square feet of total floor area and 70 percent lot coverage. The MHP guidelines will require the Hook family to contribute $1.5 million towards the construction of a new continuous Harborwalk connection linking Hook Wharf to the other side of the Moakley Bridge. A preliminary rendering of the Hook Wharf building A preliminary massing diagram of the Hook Wharf building At the site of the Harbor Garage, an existing 70-foot high parking structure, an iconic tower will be developed by owner Don Chiofaro. The MHP allows the Harbor Garage tower up to 585 feet in height to the highest occupied floor; the tower may in no case exceed the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) limit of 600 feet high. The tower may contain up to 900,000 gross square feet of total floor area and may cover up to 50 percent of the project site. The MHP guidelines will require Chiofaro to contribute $5 million in funds towards the neighboring New England Aquarium’s vision for a proposed “Blueway” waterfront greenway, and $5 million towards converting the Chart House parking lot on Long Wharf to public open space. The tower must avoid casting net new shadow on Long Wharf seaward of the existing Marriott hotel. A rendering of an earlier Harbor Garage development proposal A preliminary massing diagram of what the Harbor Garage development could look like Proposed Blueway The 42-acre waterfront area covered by the MHP, namely the area between Atlantic Avenue and the Inner Harbor stretching from Hook Wharf to Long Wharf, consists of 22 acres of filled and flowed tidelands in addition to sections of Boston Harbor. Therefore, existing planning regulations regarding height, floor area ratio (FAR), open space requirements, massing and other dimensional factors as dictated by the State of Massachusetts’ waterways protection law, Chapter 91, apply. A map of the MHP district Chapter 91 preserves public access to waterfronts and mitigates the environmental impact of new development. Additional Chapter 91 legislation enacted by the State of Massachusetts in 1990 also sets a height limit of 55 feet for new buildings over water or within 100 feet of the high-water mark. Most buildings on the Downtown Boston waterfront were built prior to the legislation; exemptions have been made for some more recent developments, for instance on Fan Pier in the Seaport District and on Lovejoy Wharf in Bulfinch Triangle. If a proposed project complies with the MHP, as with the Hook Wharf and Harbor Garage developments, then Chapter 91 height restrictions can be waived. The approved MHP also establishes climate change resiliency as a key component for general waterfront planning. The MHP has set new height allowances for improvements to existing buildings in anticipation of climate change, namely elevating mechanical systems to avoid flooding. Per the MHP, such buildings may add up to two new floors not exceeding 30 feet of new height and including mechanical systems. Height restrictions for additions to existing buildings The MHP establishes six overall goals for new development: Create a mixed-use, active neighborhood;Provide public access to Boston Harbor, the Boston Harbor Islands and water transportation;Improve wayfinding and open-space connections along the Waterfront;Enhance and create open space resources, as well as improve public realm;Ensure climate resilience; andImplement the existing Greenway District guidelines:Create and enhance access to the waterfront and South Boston;Reinforce open space;Ensure the Harborwalk is fully accessible; andDiversify abutting uses


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The Pinnacle at Central Wharf
270 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, MA, 02110